The Great American Eclipse
Monday, August 21, 2017
6:00 am to 9:00 pm

at Koneheta Park, Murphy NC

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On Aug. 21, 2017, people across the United States will see the sun disappear behind the moon, turning daylight into twilight, causing the temperature drop rapidly and revealing massive streamers of light streaking through the sky around the silhouette of the moon. On that day, America will fall under the path of a total solar eclipse.


The so-called Great American Total Solar Eclipse will darken skies all the way from Oregon to South Carolina, along a stretch of land about 70 miles (113 kilometers) wide. People who descend upon this "path of totality" for the big event are in for an unforgettable experience.

What is a total solar eclipse?
A total solar eclipse occurs when the disk of the moon appears to completely cover the disk of the sun in the sky. The fact that total solar eclipses occur at all is a quirk of cosmic geometry. The moon orbits an average of 239,000 miles (385,000 kilometers) from Earth — just the right distance to seem the same size in the sky as the much-larger sun. However, these heavenly bodies line up only about once every 18 months. 

Outside the path of totality, skywatchers in the continental U.S. and other nearby areas will see a partial solar eclipse, in which the moon appears to take a bite out of the sun's disk. Two to five solar eclipses occur each year on average, but total solar eclipses happen just once every 18 months or so.

What will I see during a total solar eclipse?

During a total solar eclipse, the disk of the moon blocks out the last sliver of light from the sun, and the sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, becomes visible. The corona is far from an indistinct haze; skywatchers report seeing great jets and ribbons of light, twisting and curling out into the sky.
During totality, the area inside the moon's shadow is cloaked in twilight — a very strange feeling to experience in the middle of the day. Just before and just after totality, observers can see this cloak of darkness moving toward them across the landscape, and then moving away.
These effects are not visible during a partial solar eclipse, so skywatchers are encouraged to see if they are inside the path of totality during the total eclipse.

From what locations will the total solar eclipse be visible?
The path of totality for the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse is about 70 miles wide and stretches from Oregon to South Carolina. It passes through Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.


REMEMBER: Looking directly at the sun, even when it is partially covered by the moon, can cause serious eye damage or blindness. NEVER look at a partial solar eclipse without proper eye protection. 

2017 Great American Eclipse

Murphy, NC

This video "follows" the moon's shadow as it sweeps over the surface of the USA on August 21, 2017. Production details are in the end credits.
Check out http://www.eclipse2017.org
for more details on the eclipse!
Murphy's location time is 5:29 on the slider.

ASHEVILLE

Citizens - Times

Part of the USA TODAY NETWORK

Here are some information articles about the event and area information, given to us by permission, to publish on this site.
  1. WNC gets International Exposure for Solar Eclipse
  2. Smokies Solar Eclipse Event Sold Out
  3. More Total Eclipse Events Planned WNC
  4. Map Details Outdoor Recreation Path of Solar Eclipse
      Articles written by Karen Chavez

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